“The Everlasting Man” and Baptizing the Intellect

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Below is the introduction to a book that a young, atheist C.S. Lewis once read.  He would later call it the best apologetic for Christianity ever written.  Here are some other things he had to say about Chesterton:

“It was here that I first read a volume of Chesterton’s essays. I had never heard of him and had no idea of what he stood for; nor can I quite understand why he made such an immediate conquest of me. It might have been expected that my pessimism, my atheism, and my hatred of sentiment would have made him to me the least congenial of all authors. It would almost seem that Providence, or some “second cause” of a very obscure kind, quite over-rules our previous tastes when It decides to bring two minds together. Liking an author may be as involuntary and improbable as falling in love. I was by now a sufficiently experienced reader to distinguish liking from agreement. I did not need to accept what Chesterton said in order to enjoy it.

His humour was of the kind I like best – not “jokes” imbedded in the page like currants in a cake, still less (what I cannot endure), a general tone of flippancy and jocularity, but the humour which is not in any way separable from the argument but is rather (as Aristotle would say) the “bloom” on dialectic itself. The sword glitters not because the swordsman set out to make it glitter but because he is fighting for his life and therefore moving it very quickly. For the critics who think Chesterton frivolous or “paradoxical” I have to work hard to feel even pity; sympathy is out of the question. Moreover, strange as it may seem, I liked him for his goodness.”  from Surprised By Joy, C.S. Lewis

So, without further ado, here is a taste of Chesterton’s Introduction to The Everlasting Man.

Enjoy!

“There are two ways of getting home; and one of them is to stay there. The other is to walk round the whole world till we come back to the same place; and I tried to trace such a journey in a story I once wrote. It is, however, a relief to turn from that topic to another story that I never wrote. Like every book I never wrote, it is by far the best book I have ever written. It is only too probable that I shall never write it, so I will use it symbolically here; for it was a symbol of the same truth. I conceived it as a romance of those vast valleys with sloping sides, like those along which the ancient White Horses of Wessex are scrawled along the flanks of the hills. It concerned some boy whose farm or cottage stood on such a slope, and who went on his travels to find something, such as the effigy and grave of some giant; and when he was far enough from home he looked back and saw that his own farm and kitchen-garden, shining flat on the hill-side like the colours and quarterings of a shield, were but parts of some such gigantic figure, on which he had always lived, but which was too large and too close to be seen …

The point of this book, in other words, is that the next best thing to being really inside Christendom is to be really outside it …

It is well with the boy when he lives on his father’s land; and well with him again when he is far enough from it to look back on it and see it as a whole …

But [many] people [today] have got into an intermediate state, have fallen into an intervening valley from which they can see neither the heights beyond them nor the heights behind.”

~ from “The Everlasting Man” by G.K. Chesterton

Find our more here: http://www.chesterton.org/lecture-44/

2 thoughts on ““The Everlasting Man” and Baptizing the Intellect

  1. Pingback: Joviality and G.K. Chesterton | Along the Beam

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